Tag: Natural Capital

Natural Capital Initiative

Natural Capital Initiative Spring newsletter 2021 This spring we been thinking and talking about the Dasgupta Review on the economics of biodiversity and what it means for the science and policy communities. The NCI has offered its natural capital priorities for coping with change while we wait for the “super year for nature” to pick up…

By Richard Powell OBE April 30, 2021 Off

Thought Piece, Natural Capital Evaluations

A certain credit card has had an advertising campaign which has used the notion that there are certain things in life which we hold so dear that we cannot put a price on them. Currently there are areas of natural capital which fall into the same category: priceless. So how, then, can we begin to…

By Wild Anglia December 13, 2016 Off

The Naturalness of Being

  “Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life”          Hermann Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte   German born Swiss poet and…

By Wild Anglia June 15, 2016 Off

Nature is a special subject

All too often, we stay in our little boxes.  Scientists talk to scientists, artists talk to artists, writers talk to… themselves (well, I do anyway).  It is a rare and special subject that brings people together, across disciplines and from a wide range of organisations. Nature is that special subject. It is all at once…

By Wild Anglia March 1, 2016 Off

The importance of bees

“If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe then man would only have four years of life left. No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man.”  –  Albert Einstein   Ok, so he may not actually have said this but the importance of bee pollination to…

By Stuart Rickards July 15, 2015 Off

Pollinator Awareness Week

This week is Pollinator Awareness Week. It is easy to take the work of our natural pollintors for granted but without them our countryside, gardens, allotments and orchards would be very different and less productive places. In Britain, honeybees, bumblebees, solitary bees, hoverflies, beetles, butterflies and moths all contribute to pollination of flowering crops. Incredibly, one…

By Stuart Rickards July 13, 2015 Off